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Demonstrators protest at Sen. Dean Heller's, R-Nev., office in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), and Temporary Protected Status (TPS), programs on Capitol Hill on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

No Closer To DACA Deal, Republicans Push Plan B To Keep Government Open

GOP lawmakers want a compromise to prevent a shutdown for at least another month. But many Democrats have promised a no-vote unless protections for "Dreamers" are part of the bargain.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump Administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington, in September. Nine of 12 members of the National Park Service advisory board resigned Monday citing Zinke's unwillingness to meet with the panel. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Majority Of National Park Service Board Resigns Citing Administration Indifference

The chairman of the board, former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles, said in a letter that the Department of the Interior showed no interest in engaging with its members.

Hydrocodone-acetaminophen pills, also known as Vicodin, arranged for a photo at a pharmacy in Montpelier, Vt. A new report from the National Safety Council says the abuse of prescription opioids has helped fuel an epidemic in overdoses. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

Opioid Crisis Blamed For Sharp Increase In Accidental Deaths In U.S.

Accidental deaths, which include overdoses, have become the third-leading killer for Americans for the first time in more than a century, according to the National Safety Council.

Colin Campbell last month in his home near Los Angeles, Calif. Campbell was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. So, instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Home Care Agencies Often Wrongly Deny Medicare Help To The Chronically Ill

Kaiser Health News

Home health firms sometimes turn away Medicare beneficiaries who have chronic health problems by incorrectly claiming Medicare won't pay their for their services, say advocates for patients.

A man gets ready to let one loose. Not pictured: all the folks around him diving for cover. CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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CSA-Printstock/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Man Ruptures His Throat By Stifling A Big Sneeze, Prompting Doctors' Warning

Not long after he suppressed a powerful sneeze, the patient's neck began swelling, crackling and popping. It was a rare case — and he recovered — but doctors say there's a moral here: Just let it rip.

An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us Billions

The law that requires America to turn some of its soybeans into diesel fuel for trucks has created a new industry. But it's costing American consumers about $5 billion each year.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks on during a hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

At a contentious congressional testimony, Kirstjen Nielsen said under oath said President Trump and others used "tough language" on immigration, but not a particular curse word.

Homeland Security Secretary Says She 'Did Not Hear' Trump Use 'That' Vulgar Word

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After Charleston chef Ben Murray committed suicide, Mickey Bakst (left) and Steve Palmer (right) started a support group for those in the restaurant business struggling with addiction. Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications hide caption

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Andrew Cebulka/Phase: 3 Marketing and Communications

In An Industry Rife With Substance Abuse, Restaurant Workers Help Their Own

Food service is fueled by high stress and late hours; it's easy to see how people in the industry can be susceptible to alcohol and drug abuse. Some who've been there are now offering help to others.

A Rohingya refugee stands in a displaced-persons camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, earlier this month. She is just one of more than 650,000 Rohingya who have fled over the border from Myanmar, where a government crackdown has spawned stories of brutal murder, rape and villages destroyed. Allison Joyce/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Joyce/Getty Images

Myanmar And Bangladesh Agree To 2-Year Timeframe For Rohingya Return

Over 655,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled Myanmar, where alleged ethnic cleansing is underway. Now, the two countries have agreed to a schedule for repatriation — but will the Rohingya actually return?

(Left) Johnathon Shillings, 28, just completed a five-year sentence and was reunited with his 8-year-old daughter, Victoria. (Right) Macario Gonzales, 27, shown with his 2-year-old daughter, Mackelsey, has just started to serve a seven-year sentence in Texas state prison. Courtesy of Johnathon Shillings and Macario Gonzales hide caption

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Courtesy of Johnathon Shillings and Macario Gonzales

How To Parent From Prison And Other Advice For Life Inside

Johnathon Shillings just got out of prison. He talks to Macario Gonzales Jr., who is serving seven years, about how to be the father his daughters deserve — and avoid becoming a target.

How To Parent From Prison And Other Advice For Life Inside

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Clarinetist and band leader Benny Goodman, photographed in 1959, made history as the first musician to perform jazz with an integrated band in Carnegie Hall in 1938. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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Central Press/Getty Images

How Benny Goodman Orchestrated 'The Most Important Concert In Jazz History'

Eighty years ago, barriers were broken when Goodman took a mixed race band to play jazz to Carnegie Hall.

How Benny Goodman Orchestrated 'The Most Important Concert In Jazz History'

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Larry Nassar listens to victim impact statements prior to being sentenced after being accused of molesting about 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. Nassar has pleaded guilty in Ingham County, Michigan, to sexually assaulting seven girls, but the judge is allowing all his accusers to speak. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Gymnastics Doctor's Victims Speak In Court; Simone Biles Says She Was Also Abused

Women talked about the devastating impact of abuse at the hands of sports doctor and admitted sexual assailant Larry Nassar. They spoke out during a four-day sentencing hearing that started Tuesday. The list of accusers is growing longer.