Lulu Garcia-Navarro Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday.

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Stephen Voss/NPR

Lulu Garcia-Navarro

Host, Weekend Edition Sunday

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday. She is infamous in the IT department of NPR for losing laptops to bullets, hurricanes, and bomb blasts.

Before joining the Sunday morning team, she served an NPR correspondent based in Brazil, Israel, Mexico, and Iraq. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage, and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement. She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton. She has also won awards for her work on migration in Mexico and the Amazon in Brazil.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-September 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. She was posted for the AP to Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion, where she stayed covering the conflict.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

Highlights from Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

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Researchers found a sudden increase in teens' symptoms of depression, suicide risk factors and suicide rates in 2012 — around the time when smartphones became popular, researcher Jean Twenge says. Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images

The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use, Study Says

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Genesis Blu calls herself a "raptivist" — a mix of rapper and activist. Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Tim Clyne/Courtesy of the artist

A Conversation With Houston's 'Raptivist' Genesis Blu

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Tosha Atibu and her husband Atibu Ty Ty stand in their Houston home, which was flooded during Hurricane Harvey. They are racing to get it shape in time for the family to move back in for Christmas. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

In Post-Harvey Houston, Immigrants Struggle As The City Grapples With How To Help

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Lashkari gives us a tour of his kitchen. He's known for some of the best Pakistani and Indian food in Houston. His cooking borrows happily from other cultures. Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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A Visit To Houston's Himalaya: Pakistani And Indian Food With Deep Texas Roots

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In 'Hiddensee,' Gregory Maguire Gets Under The Shell Of 'The Nutcracker'

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Karen Attiah, The Washington Post's global opinions editor, says current conversation surrounding sexual harassment largely excludes victims who are women of color. The Washington Post hide caption

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The Washington Post

When Black Women's Stories Of Sexual Abuse Are Excluded From The National Narrative

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Film actress Hedy Lamarr, pictured here around 1955, was both a major star on screen and an inventor by night. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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In 'Bombshell,' The Double Identity Of Hollywood Star Hedy Lamarr

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Victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual abuse and their supporters protest during a #MeToo march this month in Hollywood, Calif. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Sexual Harassment: Have We Reached A Cultural Turning Point?

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Rosogolla, a popular Indian treat, is commonly made with cottage cheese and sugar syrup. India recently granted the eastern state of Bengal ownership rights for the dessert. Nupur Dasgupta/Flickr hide caption

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Nupur Dasgupta/Flickr

The Fight Over Ownership Of An Indian Dessert Comes To A Bittersweet End

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iLe's debut album, iLevitable, is available now. Worldjunkies / Alejandro Pedrosa/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Worldjunkies / Alejandro Pedrosa/Courtesy of the artist

iLe Sings Her Grandmother's Songs And Speaks Out Through Her Music

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Julia Roberts plays Isabel, the mother of Auggie Pullman (Jacob Tremblay), in the new movie Wonder. Dale Robinette/Lionsgate hide caption

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Julia Roberts Is Mom In 'Wonder,' And In Life

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Author Explores A Dark History Through A Magical Story In 'Rise Of The Jumbies'

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Democratic National Committee Vice Chair Donna Brazile takes the stage during the second day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphiam Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

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Mark J. Terrill/AP

Donna Brazile Criticizes Clinton Camp In Campaign Memoir

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The Colorado River wraps around Horseshoe Bend in the in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area in Page, Ariz. on Feb. 11. RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images

Instagram Crowds May Be Ruining Nature

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The Property Brothers, Drew and Jonathan Scott, have a new memoir called It Takes Two. Courtesy of HGTV hide caption

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Courtesy of HGTV

The Property Brothers Flip A Page On Their TV Triumphs

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