Animals Animals

The massive dinosaur stands on display at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City last year. The plant-eating giant, which could not even fit in a single room, would have weighed more than 70 tons — or nearly the same as an empty space shuttle. Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

The chip has not been tested in humans, but it has been used to heal wounds in mice. Wexner Medical Center/The Ohio State University hide caption

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Wexner Medical Center/The Ohio State University

Photographed in Walden, Colo., in 2013, greater sage grouse perform mating rituals. The Trump administration is revising a conservation plan for the imperiled species. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Trump Administration Revises Conservation Plan For Western Sage Grouse

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New research found a link between how puppies interact with their mothers and how they perform in guide dog training. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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Westend61/Getty Images

Coddled Puppies Make Poor Guide Dogs, Study Suggests

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What attacked Sam Kanizay's feet? That question stumped marine scientists after the Australian teen emerged from the water with countless bloody pinpricks on his feet Saturday in Melbourne. Jarrod Kanizay via AP hide caption

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Jarrod Kanizay via AP

Issues Threatening Seabirds Could Extend To The Lobster Industry

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The so-called "goat plague" started out in the Ivory Coast and has spread as far as Mongolia, where goats (above) and sheep and antelopes and even camels are at risk. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

Saving Vultures With Nepal's 'Vulture Restaurant'

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This June 2008 photo shows an ancient Aboriginal rock carving in the Burrup Peninsula in the north of Western Australia. Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Wood/AFP/Getty Images

The teal blue area along the Louisiana coastline represents a "dead zone" of oxygen-depleted water. Resulting from nitrogen and phosphorus pollution in the Mississippi River, it can potentially hurt fisheries. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

The Gulf Of Mexico's Dead Zone Is The Biggest Ever Seen

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Rats and people may rely on "metamemory" in a variety of different ways, scientists say. For a rat, it's likely about knowing whether you remember that predator in the distance; for people, knowing what we don't know helps us navigate social interactions. fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images/iStockphoto

From Rats To Humans, A Brain Knows When It Can't Remember

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The defensive mucus of the Arion subfuscus slug has inspired materials scientists trying to invent better medical adhesives. Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images hide caption

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Nigel Cattlin/Visuals Unlimited/Getty Images

Slug Slime Inspires Scientists To Invent Sticky Surgical Glue

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