Asia Asia

A Visit To A Refugee Camp, Where Rohingya Are Living In Sordid Conditions

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Japanese Voters Weather Typhoon To Vote In Presidential Election

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U.S. Troops On North-South Korea Border Gear Up Amid War Threat

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Tillerson Off To Middle East And South Asia For A Round Of Diplomatic Tests

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Photographer Documenting Rohingya Crisis Describes The Images That Stayed With Him

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The Tianshan No. 1 glacier is melting fast, receding by at least 30 feet each year. Scientists warn that the glacier — the source of the Urumqi River, which more than 4 million people depend on — may disappear in the next 50 years. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

'Impossible To Save': Scientists Are Watching China's Glaciers Disappear

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Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike greets supporters in the rain during a campaign stop in the Shibuya district last Friday. John Matthews/for NPR hide caption

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John Matthews/for NPR

Tokyo Governor Hopes Her New 'Party Of Hope' Will Shake Up Japanese Politics

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China's Leader Gave A Speech This Week That Came In At 3.5 Hours

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An Afghan National Army soldier searches a vehicle at a checkpoint in Kandahar, Afghanistan, Thursday on the way to the Maiwand army base, the site of the Taliban attack late Wednesday. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Jacinda Ardern will be the next prime minister of New Zealand. Ardern, who has led the Labour Party for less than three months, spoke at a press conference Thursday at Parliament in Wellington after a coalition government was formed. Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marty Melville/AFP/Getty Images

Yu Zu'en stands in front of one of the few wall decorations in his new, government-issued apartment: a poster of China's leaders. The 84-year-old veteran lost his right eye fighting the Americans in Korea in 1951. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Xi Jinping's War On Poverty Moves Millions Of Chinese Off The Farm

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Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (center) waves to his Pakistan Muslim League supporters during a party general council meeting in Islamabad this month. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

North Korea's Cut From Small Businesses Goes To Its Nuclear Program

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Indonesian soldiers stand guard over members of the youth wing of the Indonesian Communist Party, who were packed into a truck to be taken to a Jakarta prison in October 1965. Over the next few months, the government's military leadership carried out the systematic execution of hundreds of thousands of people. /AP hide caption

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Chinese President Xi Jinping has cracked down on corruption — and dissent. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

For Clues To China's Crackdown On Public Expression, Look To Its Economy

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Rasika chef Vikram Sunderam, here with a towering dish of eggplant and potato, says, "Indian cuisine is a very personal cuisine. It's made from family to family, how they like to cook." Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

In New Cookbook, Acclaimed Indian Restaurant Finally Spills Its Secrets

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Chinese President Xi Jinping speaks Wednesday at the opening session of the 19th national congress of China's ruling Communist Party at The Great Hall Of The People in Beijing. The congress takes place every five years. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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China's President Xi Jinping gives a speech at the opening session of the Chinese Communist Party Congress on Wednesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

The Economics Behind China's Crackdown On Civil Society

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