"What can't be faked is the scenes of unbridled joy at the reunion with the parents and their daughters." - Stephanie Busari TED/TED hide caption

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TED/TED

Stephanie Busari: What Happens When Real News Is Dismissed As Fake?

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Eli Pariser, CEO of Upworthy, speaks onstage at during the 2014 SXSW Festival in Austin, Texas. At its peak, the site, which is founded on a mission of promoting viral and uplifting content, was reaching close to 90 million people a month. Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Jon Shapley/Getty Images for SXSW

Upworthy Was One Of The Hottest Sites Ever. You Won't Believe What Happened Next

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Binky is a new social media app where users can scroll, share and like random posts, but all the actions are meaningless. iTunes hide caption

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iTunes

Meet Binky, The Social Media App Where Nothing Matters

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Rep. Mike Quigley has introduced the Covfefe Act, which would expand the Presidential Records Act to include social media. Above, the Illinois Democrat on Capitol Hill on Monday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Pakistani religious students and activists gathered for a protest in Islamabad in March, as they demanded the removal of all blasphemous content from social media sites in the country. Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi /AFP/Getty Images

For two years, Hawkins let his app guide him around the globe, including a stop in Gortina, Slovenia. Courtesy of Max Hawkins hide caption

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Courtesy of Max Hawkins

Eager To Burst His Own Bubble, A Techie Made Apps To Randomize His Life

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Free Speech Legal Center Threatens To Sue Trump For Blocking Twitter Users

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It's already difficult to create distance from the technology that surrounds us, but as connectivity increases, it might become impossible to do so. Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images hide caption

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Aleksandar Nakic/Getty Images

XFR Collective member Carmel Curtis works on a VHS cartridge during an event at the Baltimore Museum of Art in March. Lorena Ramirez-Lopez/XFR Collective hide caption

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Lorena Ramirez-Lopez/XFR Collective

Videotapes Are Becoming Unwatchable As Archivists Work To Save Them

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Standard manual Olivetti M1 typewriter, without the keyboard and platen roller, 1911. Italy, 20th century. DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

'Covfefe': The Tweet Heard Around The Wrold

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A woman looks at a memorial at the Hollywood Transit Center in Portland, Ore., on Thursday. Last week three men were stabbed, two fatally, after they stood up for two young women who were being harassed on a MAX train at the center. Natalie Behring/Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Getty Images

Alexei Navalny's YouTube show attracts a million views per episode. The Putin critic offers breezy commentary on the week's events, fields questions from his Twitter feed and heaps scorn on the Kremlin. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Banned From Russian TV, A Putin Critic Gets His Message Out On YouTube

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