A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR

Liberty Orchards in Cashmere, Wash., which was founded by two Armenian immigrants, still makes Aplets & Cotlets, a variation of Turkish delight that includes apples, apricots and walnuts. Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Liberty Orchards Co., Inc.

Starship Technologies' delivery robots, which can be found traveling the sidewalks of Washington, D.C., get smarter the more they drive — learning about sidewalk and traffic patterns with every trip they take. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Guest workers harvest much of North Carolina's sweet potato crop, including at the fields of Burch Farms, in Faison, N.C. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Dan Charles/NPR

Fearful Farmers Rush To Find 'Guest Workers'

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Cows graze at Dharma Lea Farm in Sharon Springs, N.Y. Advocates of grass-grazing cattle say it's better for the environment and the animals. But there's another upside: Grass-fed meat and dairy fetch a premium that can help small farms stay viable. Courtesy of Maple Hill Creamery hide caption

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Courtesy of Maple Hill Creamery

While tuna poke may be winning over American palates today, our consumption of fresh tuna is still dwarfed by our collective appetite for the canned stuff. Whole Foods Market hide caption

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Whole Foods Market

Nowruz, the Persian New Year, is a celebration of the start of spring marked through large parts of the Middle East and Central Asia. Above, a Nowruz haftseen table, laden with seven items meant to symbolize rebirth or renewal. creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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creativeelixir/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Brazilians are prolific meat-eaters, so they are struggling with allegations that health officials accepted bribes to allow subpar meat on the market. Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Moriyama/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Anyone who has read or seen Victor Hugo's masterpiece knows the plot of Les Miserables turns on the theft of a simple loaf of bread. There was no sharper barometer of economic status in 19th-century France than bread. Minnie Phan for NPR hide caption

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Minnie Phan for NPR

For Brisket Aficionados, Austin's Franklin BBQ Is A Must in Texas

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What A Cold Week Means For Cranberries, Blueberries And Peaches

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As they travel the parade route, tuxedoed men and youths distribute strings of colorful beads, dried fava beans and genuine Italian kisses. Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society hide caption

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Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society

In an image from the first Foxfire book, students in 1969 look on as Hobe Beasley, John Hopper and Hopper's wife suspend a hog for finishing the work of scalding and scraping. Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of The Foxfire Fund, Inc.

Sea algae at low tide along the Irish coast. Seaweed was long a part of Irish cuisine. Nutrient-rich, it helped some survive the Great Famine. Irish cooks reviving the practice say it's not just good for you – it's a zap of flavor from the sea. AdventurePicture/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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AdventurePicture/Getty Images/iStockphoto

(Top) Howdy Holmes talks with employee Sandy Parker on the factory floor. Parker started working at Jiffy when she was 24 years old, nearly 38 years ago. (Bottom left) Historical photos line the walls of the factory entrance. (Bottom right) Employee lockers. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How To Make Boring Sell: In A Jiffy

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Green shoots of cereal rye, a popular cover crop, emerge in a field where corn was recently harvested in Iowa. The grass will go dormant in winter, then resume growing in the spring. Less than three percent of corn fields in the state have cover crops. Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa hide caption

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Courtesy of Practical Farmers of Iowa