A new study shows that when infants and young children grow up in households without enough to eat, they are more likely to perform poorly at school years later. Daniel Fishel for NPR hide caption

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Daniel Fishel for NPR
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity

The Forces Driving Middle-Aged White People's 'Deaths Of Despair'

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How The 'Scarcity Mindset' Can Make Problems Worse

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Of the million or so Americans a year who get sepsis, roughly 300,000 die. Unfortunately, many treatments for the condition have looked promising in small, preliminary studies, only to fail in follow-up research. Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Reptile8488/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Doctor Turns Up Possible Treatment For Deadly Sepsis

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Researchers used online data to model the vaccination rate in communities affected by an outbreak of mumps in Arkansas. Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR hide caption

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Maimuna Majumder/HealthMap; Alyson Hurt/NPR

A baby receives the rotavirus vaccine during a clinical trial in Niger. The new vaccine is the first designed specifically for children in sub-Saharan Africa. It doesn't require refrigeration and will be cheaper than ones currently available. Krishan Cheyenne/MSF hide caption

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Krishan Cheyenne/MSF

Scientists have developed a smartphone app to measure sperm count at home. Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School hide caption

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Hadi Shafiee/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

The Flame Refluxer is essentially a big copper blanket: think Brillo pad of wool sandwiched between mesh. Using it while burning off oil yields less air pollution and residue that harms marine life. Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Researchers Test Hotter, Faster And Cleaner Way To Fight Oil Spills

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Embryoids like this one are created from stem cells and resemble very primitive human embryos. Scientists are studying them in hopes of learning more about basic human biology and development. Courtesy of Rockefeller University hide caption

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Courtesy of Rockefeller University

Christopher Milford in his apartment in East Boston, Mass. He quit abusing opioids after getting endocarditis three times. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Doctors Consider Ethics Of Costly Heart Surgery For People Addicted To Opioids

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The Edicule in Jerusalem's Church of the Holy Sepulchre is traditionally believed to be the site of Jesus' tomb. A $4 million restoration project, led by a Greek team, has cleaned and reinforced the structure. Sebastian Scheiner/AP hide caption

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Sebastian Scheiner/AP

Tomb Of Jesus Is Restored In Jerusalem

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The American Iron and Steel Institute is one of the trade groups that wants Congress to undo the stronger safety regulation enacted in 2016 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Congress May Undo Rule That Pushes Firms To Keep Good Safety Records

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Climate Change As An Issue Of National Security

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Gilead Sciences Inc. makes the two leading drugs that can quickly cure hepatitis C infections. But most patients can't afford the expensive drugs, and states restrict their use among Medicaid patients. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Should The U.S. Government Buy A Drug Company To Save Money?

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A still from a film recently digitized by a team at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The film shows a 1958 explosion at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Screen grab by NPR/YouTube hide caption

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Screen grab by NPR/YouTube