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Moscow Sees Only 6 Minutes Of Sunlight During All Of December

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In one study, participants who routinely got less than seven hours of sleep were coached to extend their sleep time. They also changed their diets, without being asked — taking in less sugar each day. Jenny Dettrick/Getty Images hide caption

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Jenny Dettrick/Getty Images

Yellows, oranges and reds show regions where the average temperature from 2013 to 2017 was higher than a baseline average from 1951 to 1980, according to an analysis by NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio hide caption

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NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

Aaron Hernandez (81), of the New England Patriots, lost his helmet during this play against the New York Jets in 2011. Hernandez killed himself in 2017, and researchers found that he had had one of the most severe cases of CTE ever seen in someone his age. Elsa/Getty Images hide caption

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Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

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Robert Murray of Murray Energy (right) meets with Energy Secretary Rick Perry at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington in a March 29, 2017, photo obtained by The Associated Press. Simon Edelman/AP hide caption

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Simon Edelman/AP

Dr. Mathilde Krim at the World AIDS Day Symposium presented by the Foundation For AIDS Research and the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2002. Krim had a knack for helping people talk about HIV/AIDS rationally, colleagues say. Theo Wargo/WireImage hide caption

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Theo Wargo/WireImage

Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her Activism

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A grande Cafe Nero, large Costa Coffee and venti-sized Starbucks to-go cups sold in London. The U.K. Parliament is considering a tax on disposable cups in an effort to cut down on waste. Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images

Ronda Goldfein, attorney and executive director of the AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, holds an envelope that revealed a person's HIV status through the clear window. Elana Gordon/WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon/WHYY

Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy Breach

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Night Became Day In Detroit As Meteor Lit Up Sky

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Review Of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Paints A Picture Of A More Dangerous Nuclear World

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Saigas lie dead in Torgai Betpak Dala in Kazakhstan during the mass mortality event in May 2015. Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK) hide caption

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Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary College, London, UK)

Astronomers have discovered a star, shown in an artist's rendition, that appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

A car dashcam captures a view of a meteor near Bloomfield Hills, Mich., on Tuesday in this still image from video obtained from social media. Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters hide caption

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Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke speaks on the Trump administration's energy policy at the Heritage Foundation in Washington in September 2017. Nine of 12 members of the National Park Service advisory board resigned Monday citing Zinke's unwillingness to meet with the panel. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Colin Campbell, shown last month in his home near Los Angeles, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease — ALS — eight years ago. He gets Medicare because of his disability, but was incorrectly told by several agencies that he couldn't use it for home care. Instead, he pays $4,000 a month for those services. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

An engineer shows a sample of biodiesel at an industrial complex in General Lagos, Santa Fe province, Argentina. The United States recently imposed duties on Argentine biodiesel, blocking it from the U.S. market. Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images

Rebeca Gonzalez says she can now afford to buy pomegranates for her family in Garden Grove, Calif., because of the extra money she receives through Más Fresco, a food stamp incentive program for purchasing produce. Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News

A skull discovered at a sacred Aztec temple. A new study analyzed DNA extracted from the teeth of people who died in a 16th century epidemic that destroyed the Aztec empire, and found a type of salmonella may have caused the epidemic. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Urchin Triptych is one of hundreds of Christopher Marley artworks on display at the Gallery of Amazing Things' "Biophilia" exhibition. Christopher Marley Studio hide caption

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Christopher Marley Studio

Oregon Artist Turns Dead Creatures Into Beautiful Compositions

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