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NASA Astronauts Set To Get Sweet Treat With Next Delivery To International Space Station

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Scientists Move To Establish Wildlife Preserve At Guantanamo Bay

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The Homeland Security website Ready.gov warns that following a nuclear blast, you should wash your hair with shampoo but not use conditioner, because conditioner can bind radioactive material to your hair. Smith Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Getty Images

The wind direction from the fire in western Greenland has largely blown smoke toward the island's ice sheet and away from communities. Pierre Markuse/Flicker hide caption

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Pierre Markuse/Flicker

Greenland Is Still Burning, But The Smoke May Be The Real Problem

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Arthritis is a joint disease that can cause cartilage destruction and erosion of the bone, as well as tendon inflammation and rupture. Affected areas are highlighted in red in this enhanced X-ray. Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source hide caption

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Philippe Sellem/Paul Demri/ Voisin/Science Source

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

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Nisian Hughes/Getty Images

New Study Highlights Strong Link Between Basic Research And Inventions

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On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both professional and amateur astronomers gathered to watch. Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr hide caption

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Romeo Durscher/NASA Goddard Space Center/Flickr

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

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