Women worry that bad things will happen if they exercise while pregnant, but doctors say in almost all cases it's not just safe, but can improve health. Alija/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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The American Iron and Steel Institute is one of the trade groups that wants Congress to undo the stronger safety regulation enacted in 2016 by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. michal-rojek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Congress May Undo Rule That Pushes Firms To Keep Good Safety Records

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A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Tax Credits, Penalties And Age Rating: Parsing The GOP Health Bill

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Wounds infected with antibiotic-resistant staph often heal, but the bacteria can remain inside a person's body and cause future infections. Michelle Kondrich for NPR hide caption

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By combining results of common blood tests, the researchers were able to come up with a way to predict risk of diabetes and other chronic diseases. Martynasfoto/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Birth control pills actually may be safer for teenagers than for older women, a study finds. BSIP/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Over-The-Counter Birth Control Pills Would Be Safe For Teens, Researchers Say

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Opana ER was reformulated to make it harder to crush and snort, but people abusing the drug turned to injecting it instead. And that fueled an HIV outbreak in Indiana. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Cancer patient John Krahne has delayed taking a prescribed cancer drug because it was too expensive. He walks near his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Robert Durell for Kaiser Health News

Cecile Richards, the president of Planned Parenthood, says the health care provider takes in about $400 million per year in reimbursements under Medicaid and other federal programs. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Planned Parenthood Would Lose Millions In Payments Under GOP Health Plan

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According to the Congressional Budget Office, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act would lead to 24 million people losing insurance. But that could depend on how you define "insurance." Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats in the International Space Station in September 2016, wearing a spacesuit decorated by patients recovering at the MD Anderson Cancer Center. NASA Johnson/Flickr hide caption

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A Microbe Hunter Plies Her Trade In Space

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Over three years, a campaign urged Howard County, Md., residents to pare back on sugary drinks — through ads, social media, health counseling and changes to what vending machines sold. And it worked. Adrian Burke/Getty Images hide caption

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Surgeon and writer Atul Gawande has spoken out against the Republican plan to repeal parts of the Affordable Care Act. Lisa Lake/Getty Images for Geisinger Healt/Getty Images hide caption

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Surgeon On Health Care Bill: The Stakes Are 'Extremely High' For Patients

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